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Mr. Done Right's Blog

Find Out How You Can Have A Michelangelo Ceiling

Products To Use

Painting an ornate, aluminum ceiling in fine detail is easy because it is painted before it gets fixed to the ceiling. Most aluminum paneling is sold with etch primer already on it so it is immediately ready to paint. You can use one colour over the whole ceiling, you can add just a touch of colour on the moldings or you can can paint every detail in various shades of paint. The patterns in aluminum ceilings are more deeply pressed than other types of ceilings so they create lovely shadows themselves just from electric light or from natural daylight. Accordingly most people use one colour of paint over the whole ceiling. It is strongly recommended that pale shades of paint be used. Darker colours can be appealing in theory but in practice they can often give a heavy oppressive feel to a room. Oil based paints otherwise known as enamel paints, are the best products to use on metal. They give a tough finish which will last a long time. You don’t want to re-paint your lovely ceiling at any stage so use good quality paints.

In really tough wear and tear areas such as on pub walls or in front of bars it can be a good idea to consider powder coating. This is a high heat treatment which coats the panels on both sides and produces a tougher finish than standard oil paints. There is a limited range of colours used in powder coating but generally there is a colour to suit most tastes. Always consider how you will paint your panels before you order them. If powder coating is your choice then you will need to order your panels minus the etch primer. Powder coating and etch primer are not compatible. Powder coating companies can be located in your Yellow Pages telephone directory. Powder coating would generally be considered excessive on a normal ceiling which is not subject to wear and tear.

Brushes

Brushes with a width of about 2 -3 inches (6 -7 cm) are the largest you should use when painting the base color of your panels. You will need to paint at least two coats. If dark colours are used then you may need a third coat. Choose the best quality brush you can afford so that you are not continually picking off hairs from your beautiful paint job. When painting the fine details you will need much smaller brushes. Use artist brushes, sizes 6 and 4 to start with and progress from there. Always try to be consistent in the way you paint. For example, always paint your leaves with brush strokes in one direction only. Have a small pot of turpentine at hand and also a box of cheap cotton buds. Any paint excesses or errors can be smartly wiped away with a cotton bud which has been moistened with the turps.

How Much Detail to Paint

Remember that the ceiling will always be several feet above your head so exceedingly fine details may not be seen from that distance. It is easy to paint too much detail into ceiling panels. Remember “less is often best”. Too many colours can make your ceiling look too “busy”. Every so often you should stand back from your work and assess it from several feet away.

After The Ceiling Is Installed

When the ceiling is nailed up you should take a look at the nail heads – if you can find them. Because such small nails are used you may find that they are not visible. If necessary you can paint a tiny amount of paint on the nail heads.

Thank you for taking the time with me to learn more about what Mr. Done Right, the handyman / contractor does for you.

Sincerely,

Don Fenton

(AKA) Mr. Done Right

For more information on handyman or contractor work in the greater Austin area (or beyond), please contact your premiere handyman, Don Fenton, AKA Mr. Done Right Handyman Contractor of Austin, because Mr. Done Right ensures any repairs and/or remodels get Done Right the first time! Call us now for a free estimate! 512-659-8931

www.Handyman-Austin.com

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Can You fit Your Own Ornate Ceiling? Have A Go!

Use aluminum instead of tin.

An aluminum alloy has now been created to especially suit these beautiful art metal ceilings. Aluminum is a corrosion resistant, durable product which doesn’t rust, unlike steel which is used by some manufactures of pressed tin. The panels are still widely known as pressed tin even though they are not made from tin.

How do the panels attach to the ceiling?

The easiest way to install pressed tin is to firstly fix building ply to the old ceiling or walls and then nail the tin to the ply. Timber battens can be used but building ply makes the job much easier. It is best to remove existing cornice before the ply is fixed to the ceiling.Most reputable ceiling suppliers will offer detailed fitting instructions. If you lack experience in this area, you may prefer to employ someone with building experience. However, most metal ceilings are fitted by their owners. Fitting the ply to your existing ceiling is very much dependent on the type of ceiling you already have. Instructions on this aspect of the job are outside the scope of this article. If you are lucky enough to have timber ceilings then you can omit this step and nail straight on to the timber.

Finding the centre lines of the room.

When fitting your ceiling panels it is important to have them sitting square. Very few rooms are built truly square – even modern rooms. So, you need to find the centre of the ceiling and also the centre of the four edges of the ceiling. Draw clearly visible lines dividing the ceiling into equal halves and then quarters. You will start to lay your metal from the centre of the ceiling and then work out toward the edges. This method will ensure that any discrepancies in your ceiling are halved by the time you reach the edges of your room.

Cornice first.

These fitting instructions assume that you have already painted your panels before installation begins. Painting them first is the easiest way to proceed – especially if you want the panels painted in fine detail. After drawing out your central line markings you must first attach your crown cornice. Most cornices have flanges along one side of their length which will later be covered up by the flat ceiling paneling. These flanges must be nailed to the plywood. The lower edge of the crown cornice is nailed to timber batten supports which are attached to the walls. Some manufacturers are now supplying aluminum strips which attach to the walls and then the cornice clips onto the aluminum strips. Ask your supplier for advice on installing their cornices.

Lay it out on the floor.

Before you attach the main ceiling paneling you should layout the panels on the floor to familiarize yourself with them and to get some useful practice for later on. When people walk into this room, from what direction do they see the ceiling? In order that the joins in the paneling are not visible you should lap the panels away from the main door into the room.

Main paneling.

Tacking nails should be used initially until you are satisfied you have everything in its final position. Tacking nails are quite long and must only be partially nailed in so that they can be removed easily with pliers. When you are satisfied that everything is in the right spot then you can systematically remove the tacking nails and finish the job off with small nails. Details of which nails to use should be in the manufacturers fitting instructions. Start nailing the main paneling from the centre of the room out toward the edges remembering to be consistent with panel lapping. If you are using an all-over small pattern then you can continue to nail your panels right out to the cornices – trimming the outside panels so until they fit tightly up against the crown cornices. If you are using a larger design in your main panelling then you will need to stop well short of the cornices so that molding strips and border/filler panels can be fitted. Most of the larger designs require a border or filler strip around the edge, otherwise they don’t look so elegant when installed. Border or filler panels most usually have a small pattern on them which complements the larger main panels in the centre of the ceiling. If you require a border around your main panels then it will be worth consulting an expert to find out how wide the border should be. It is easy to upset the balance of your ceiling by having a border that is too wide or conversely too narrow. Ask your supplier for help on this topic. Please ensure you read your manufactures fitting instructions carefully after the main paneling is installed because certain parts of the ceiling must be nailed down in a particular order so that the ceiling is finished off professionally.

Accessories.

There are now delightful aluminum accessories which give a classy finish to ceilings. There are corner mitre attachments which hide any rough cutting in the area where the cornices are mitred. There are also rosettes to place at the junction of the molding strips.

Ceiling Medallions.

If budget and ceiling height permit then you might consider installing an aluminum ceiling medallion. These are truly works of art. They are all cut out by hand and because of this, they are not particularly cheap items to buy. However, the effect they create is absolutely stunning.

 

Are You Thinking About Buying Ornate Tin Ceiling Tiles?

Use Aluminium Instead Of Tin

An aluminum alloy has now been created to especially suit these beautiful art metal ceilings. Aluminum is a corrosion resistant, durable product which doesn’t rust, unlike steel which is used by some manufactures of pressed tin. The panels are still widely known as pressed tin even though they are not made from tin.

Think About The Design In Your Ceiling Panels And whether They Will Suit The Measurements Of your Room

With a little forethought you can create a “tin” ceiling that exudes the “Wow Factor”. The “Wow Factor” is the reaction you will receive when your visitors look at your new ceiling for the first time. To get that factor you need to spend a little time thinking about how the ceiling panels will fit your particular room. If the repeat pattern you have chosen measures two feet by two feet, will you need to trim all the outside panels in order for them to fit the dimensions of your room? If this would be the case then you need to re-think your plans. You have two choices: choose a small all-over style which will look perfectly fine if trimmed to fit the room or you can use a border panel around the outside of your room and have the larger designs in the centre of the ceiling. Most of the larger designs require a border or filler strip around the edge, otherwise they don’t look so elegant when installed. Border or filler panels most usually have a small pattern on them which complements the larger main panels in the centre of the ceiling. If you require a border around your main panels then it will be worth consulting an expert to find out how wide the border should be. It is easy to upset the balance of your ceiling by having a border that is too wide or conversely too narrow. Ask your supplier for help on this topic.

Is Crown Cornice Needed?

There is now a delightful range of crown cornice moldings made from aluminum. These come in a variety of sizes to suit various ceiling heights. Crown cornices need to be mitred in the corners of the room and there are now various accessories to suit the individual cornices. These accessories are very handy as they hide the mitred cut edges which can sometimes be a little rough for those home handymen who have little experience in mitring. An alternative to metal crown cornices are timber moldings. Plaster cornices should not be used with metal ceilings.

Can You Install Your Tin Ceilings Yourself?

The easiest way to install pressed tin is to firstly fix building ply to the old ceiling or walls and then nail the tin to the ply. Timber battens can be used but building ply makes the job much easier. It is best to remove existing cornice before the ply is fixed to the ceiling.
Most reputable ceiling suppliers will offer detailed fitting instructions. If you lack experience in this area, you may prefer to employ someone with building experience. However, most metal ceilings are fitted by their owners. Tacking nails should be used initially until you are satisfied you have everything in its final position. Tacking nails are quite long and must only be partly nailed in so that they can be removed easily with pliers. When you are satisfied that everything is in the right spot then you can remove the tacking nails and finish the job off with small nails. Details of which nails to use should be in the manufacturers fitting instructions.

Painting your Metal Panels

Painting an ornate, aluminum ceiling in fine detail is easy because it is painted before it gets fixed to the ceiling. Most aluminum paneling is sold with etch primer already on it so it is immediately ready to paint. You can use one colour over the whole ceiling, you can add just a touch of colour on the moldings or you can can paint every detail in various shades of paint. The patterns in aluminum ceilings are more deeply pressed than other types of ceilings so they create lovely shadows themselves just from electric light or from natural daylight. Accordingly most people use one colour of paint over the whole ceiling. It is strongly recommended that pale shades of paint be used. Darker colours can be appealing in theory but in practice they can often give a heavy oppressive feel to a room. Oil based paints are recommended. If the nails are still visible you can dob each one with a little paint.

Thank you for taking the time with me to learn more about what Mr. Done Right, the handyman / contractor does for you.

Sincerely,

Don Fenton

(AKA) Mr. Done Right

For more information on handyman or contractor work in the greater Austin area (or beyond), please contact your premiere handyman, Don Fenton, AKA Mr. Done Right Handyman of Austin, because Mr. Done Right ensures any repairs and/or remodels get Done Right the first time!  Call us now for a free estimate! 512-659-8931

www.Handyman-Austin.com

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